The Linguistic Tree of Gondor.
matthen:

An interesting diagram showing the family tree of Indo-European languages. At the bottom is Proto-Indo-European, the reconstructed common ancestor. Its word *wel (‘turn’), for example, gave rise eventually to English words including: waltz, valve, convolve, evolve, revolt, valley, helix, wallow, willow, walk and Helen. [read this book!] [image source]

The Linguistic Tree of Gondor.

matthen:

An interesting diagram showing the family tree of Indo-European languages. At the bottom is Proto-Indo-European, the reconstructed common ancestor. Its word *wel (‘turn’), for example, gave rise eventually to English words including: waltz, valve, convolve, evolve, revolt, valley, helix, wallow, willow, walk and Helen. [read this book!] [image source]

Reblogged from matthen

Awesome Foreign Word of the Day: Jung

Jung (Korean): a feeling that is stronger than love and can only be proved when surviving a difficult argument.
Prononciation: Jung

This word should come with confetti and sparklers and a parade.

Let me explain.

I feel this word portrays something so epic in the love category that at the end of the argument, when you have achieved the highest love-honor of ‘jung’, a banner should fall down from the ceiling, one that reads ‘You Effing Did It’ and as it unravels there are balloons and a man in a top hat who will fly out of nowhere and deliver to you a bouquet of sparklers and designer cupcakes. This isn’t your pansy argument about who forgot to buy milk or who made who feel invalidated. This is your nuclear, fire raining from the sky brand of argument. The one where you throw your hands up and say, ‘this just isn’t working out’ and just when it seems it might end right there and then, you come back from the brink of relationship extinction, teetering away from that horrifying cliff and into the safe arms of your ‘constant.’

THAT is jung.

So, doesn’t it only seem fair that some sort of mini circus would explode from your floors and closets as you veer away from the relationship self destruct button? 

Language Learning (Medium): So, I agree with all of you in that it’s weird that German was left out of ‘Easy’ and it appears it isn’t considered medium either. Alas, we’ll just have to stick it in the in between of Easy and Medium. Lame. I have for you the medium languages - do we agree? More importantly, do we have an accord?

Language Learning (Medium): So, I agree with all of you in that it’s weird that German was left out of ‘Easy’ and it appears it isn’t considered medium either. Alas, we’ll just have to stick it in the in between of Easy and Medium. Lame. I have for you the medium languages - do we agree? More importantly, do we have an accord?

All Modern Language/Linguistics majors should be given this at some point during their studies …
arrowsofhopeandlight:

iklees:

Cascadilla Press “Fields of Linguistics” poster

Let’s count the fields that I’m apparently interested in [and learn their names!]
Historical Linguistics (Studying as many languages as possible)
Lexicography (Caring about what words mean more than anything else)
Pragmatics (How context affects meanings)
Neurolinguistics (How our brains work and liking scientific equipment)
Psycholinguistics (Liking scientific equipment doesn’t mean I have to work with them)
Sociolinguistics (Do research in the real world close to home)
Linguistic Fieldwork (Do research not close to home)
Corpus linguistics (Do research on a computer and do some stats with it)
Second language acquisition (Do research in a classroom)
First language acquisition (Do research at home/in lab with small kids)
…Sigh.

All Modern Language/Linguistics majors should be given this at some point during their studies …

arrowsofhopeandlight:

iklees:

Cascadilla Press “Fields of Linguistics” poster

Let’s count the fields that I’m apparently interested in [and learn their names!]

  1. Historical Linguistics (Studying as many languages as possible)
  2. Lexicography (Caring about what words mean more than anything else)
  3. Pragmatics (How context affects meanings)
  4. Neurolinguistics (How our brains work and liking scientific equipment)
  5. Psycholinguistics (Liking scientific equipment doesn’t mean I have to work with them)
  6. Sociolinguistics (Do research in the real world close to home)
  7. Linguistic Fieldwork (Do research not close to home)
  8. Corpus linguistics (Do research on a computer and do some stats with it)
  9. Second language acquisition (Do research in a classroom)
  10. First language acquisition (Do research at home/in lab with small kids)

…Sigh.

(via storiesabouteternity)

Source iklees

Reblogged from iklees