I hope you understand the enormity of this graph/table/pictogram as you sit there with your nonplussed expression. There is a plethora of information here … I am literally dying from excitement. 
Read: I hope you understand how evil and excessively wicked this … is as you sit their all baffled and confused like. There is way too much information here … I am dead. From excitement. 
thebroadcaster:

10 Most Misunderstood Words in English

I hope you understand the enormity of this graph/table/pictogram as you sit there with your nonplussed expression. There is a plethora of information here … I am literally dying from excitement. 

Read: I hope you understand how evil and excessively wicked this … is as you sit their all baffled and confused like. There is way too much information here … I am dead. From excitement. 

thebroadcaster:

10 Most Misunderstood Words in English

Reblogged from thebroadcaster

Yiddish: All Up In New York’s Face (and a bit of Florida’s, too)
Schlep - being a New Jersey native, I am quite familiar with this word, intimate even. We use schlep as a way to describe hauling something from one place to another. We even have a mover in the Garden State called, ‘Schleppers Movers’. Oh, New Jersey.
Example: I am tired of schlepping your rock collection all over the damned place. 
or, You better not get wasted tonight. There is NO way I am schlepping your ass around Times Square. 
misspepita:
This map shows where the majority of Yiddish speakers are located in the United States, as of the 2000 Cenus. It reminded me of a PBS documentary I watched in my Linguistic Anthropology class called “American Tongues”. In one part, they briefly showed people from NYC describing a particular word in Yiddish, and then showed people from other regions of the US (if I recall correctly, it was people from the South and then the Midwest) attempting to describe the same word. Seeing as how the documentary was from 1988, it made me wonder if nowadays, people not from the New York or the surrounding area would be able to accurately describe the same word, or if they’d still struggle with defining it.
So here is my quick question for you, tumblr! Reblog if you can describe what the word ‘schlep’ means. (naturally, this question is off limits for Yiddish speakers)

Yiddish: All Up In New York’s Face (and a bit of Florida’s, too)

Schlep - being a New Jersey native, I am quite familiar with this word, intimate even. We use schlep as a way to describe hauling something from one place to another. We even have a mover in the Garden State called, ‘Schleppers Movers’. Oh, New Jersey.

Example: I am tired of schlepping your rock collection all over the damned place. 

or, You better not get wasted tonight. There is NO way I am schlepping your ass around Times Square. 

misspepita:

This map shows where the majority of Yiddish speakers are located in the United States, as of the 2000 Cenus. It reminded me of a PBS documentary I watched in my Linguistic Anthropology class called “American Tongues”. In one part, they briefly showed people from NYC describing a particular word in Yiddish, and then showed people from other regions of the US (if I recall correctly, it was people from the South and then the Midwest) attempting to describe the same word.
Seeing as how the documentary was from 1988, it made me wonder if nowadays, people not from the New York or the surrounding area would be able to accurately describe the same word, or if they’d still struggle with defining it.

So here is my quick question for you, tumblr! Reblog if you can describe what the word ‘schlep’ means. (naturally, this question is off limits for Yiddish speakers)

Reblogged from misspepita

Awesome Foreign Word of the Day: Wanktok

Wanktok (Tok Pisin): a word in the Papua New Guinea Tok Pisin creole that refers to people who speak the same language as you do and have some form of claim on you. 
Pronounced:  Wahn-tok 

This word usually refers only to a people within families, villages, clans and slightly larger areas due to the generally small size of Papua New Guinea and its clans. Wanktok expresses the idea that people who share a common language are, in a way, indebted to each other, that they might as well be related by blood and are thusly expected to watch after and take care of their fellow Tok Pisin speakers. The linguistic isolation of Papua New Guineans is what allowed for such a word to come into being; imagine if every English speaker submitted some sort of claim on every other English speaker. Or if every Chinese speaker laid claim on other Chinese speakers. SO MUCH CLAIM.

But is that such a bad thing?

That would mean somebody would have given my sad, pathetic soul a ride last month when I was trudging down a hellishly hot backroad, locked out of my car, looking as tragic as possible, staring forlornly at the half consumed donut in my hand (most regrettable donut trip ever). Someone would have had to take responsibility for me. I would have delighted them with stories and cooked them a fabulous dinner, recognizing my own role to play in wanktok.

I submit that we should start practicing wanktok; the world would be a whole lot more friendly (and with less incidents of donut-runs-gone-bad) if we did.

Awesome Foreign Word of the Day: Mono No Aware

Mono no aware 物の哀れ  (Japanese): literally meaning ‘the pathos of things’, mono no aware is a term used to describe the awareness of the impermanence of all things and the gentles sadness one feels at their passing.  
Prononciation: moh-no no ah-wah-ray 

Imagine if ‘mono-no-aware’ and Ya’aburnee had a linguistic love child. Imagine it. It would be the most beautiful word this world has ever seen; this word would be so powerful and full of tiger blood the masses would have coronaries at the mere whisper of the word.

It’s impending marriage to ya’aburnee aside, this word expresses that wistful feeling one experiences as ‘all good things come to an end.’ It describes that intense awareness one experiences as moment as it slips by. One example is Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu’s ending a film  with a character saying ‘ii tenki desu ne’, meaning, ‘fine weather, isn’t it?’ during the paradigm shift or climax.

Unfortunately, my own life is nowhere near as epic as a Yasujiro Ozu film or a Haruki Murakami novel. I have to settle for moments that look something like this:

You: It’s too bad your flying privileges were revoked after that whole ‘free-pretzels-and-headphones’ rebellion you tried to start …
Me: *looks wistfully up at the sky, giving a heavy sigh* I’m a leaf on the wind. Watch how I soar.
The End. 

*Corrected pronunciation - i might have been crazy when I wrote this.