I hope you understand the enormity of this graph/table/pictogram as you sit there with your nonplussed expression. There is a plethora of information here … I am literally dying from excitement. 
Read: I hope you understand how evil and excessively wicked this … is as you sit their all baffled and confused like. There is way too much information here … I am dead. From excitement. 
thebroadcaster:

10 Most Misunderstood Words in English

I hope you understand the enormity of this graph/table/pictogram as you sit there with your nonplussed expression. There is a plethora of information here … I am literally dying from excitement. 

Read: I hope you understand how evil and excessively wicked this … is as you sit their all baffled and confused like. There is way too much information here … I am dead. From excitement. 

thebroadcaster:

10 Most Misunderstood Words in English

Reblogged from thebroadcaster

Yiddish: All Up In New York’s Face (and a bit of Florida’s, too)
Schlep - being a New Jersey native, I am quite familiar with this word, intimate even. We use schlep as a way to describe hauling something from one place to another. We even have a mover in the Garden State called, ‘Schleppers Movers’. Oh, New Jersey.
Example: I am tired of schlepping your rock collection all over the damned place. 
or, You better not get wasted tonight. There is NO way I am schlepping your ass around Times Square. 
misspepita:
This map shows where the majority of Yiddish speakers are located in the United States, as of the 2000 Cenus. It reminded me of a PBS documentary I watched in my Linguistic Anthropology class called “American Tongues”. In one part, they briefly showed people from NYC describing a particular word in Yiddish, and then showed people from other regions of the US (if I recall correctly, it was people from the South and then the Midwest) attempting to describe the same word. Seeing as how the documentary was from 1988, it made me wonder if nowadays, people not from the New York or the surrounding area would be able to accurately describe the same word, or if they’d still struggle with defining it.
So here is my quick question for you, tumblr! Reblog if you can describe what the word ‘schlep’ means. (naturally, this question is off limits for Yiddish speakers)

Yiddish: All Up In New York’s Face (and a bit of Florida’s, too)

Schlep - being a New Jersey native, I am quite familiar with this word, intimate even. We use schlep as a way to describe hauling something from one place to another. We even have a mover in the Garden State called, ‘Schleppers Movers’. Oh, New Jersey.

Example: I am tired of schlepping your rock collection all over the damned place. 

or, You better not get wasted tonight. There is NO way I am schlepping your ass around Times Square. 

misspepita:

This map shows where the majority of Yiddish speakers are located in the United States, as of the 2000 Cenus. It reminded me of a PBS documentary I watched in my Linguistic Anthropology class called “American Tongues”. In one part, they briefly showed people from NYC describing a particular word in Yiddish, and then showed people from other regions of the US (if I recall correctly, it was people from the South and then the Midwest) attempting to describe the same word.
Seeing as how the documentary was from 1988, it made me wonder if nowadays, people not from the New York or the surrounding area would be able to accurately describe the same word, or if they’d still struggle with defining it.

So here is my quick question for you, tumblr! Reblog if you can describe what the word ‘schlep’ means. (naturally, this question is off limits for Yiddish speakers)

Reblogged from misspepita

Also, jung isn't just about romantic love; Koreans often use it to describe the relationship they have with all others in the world, or specifically all Koreans. It's a strong connection; a mix of love, willingness to help in any time of need... It's really hard to explain. It's like they're family, and you'd never think of betraying or hurting them.

hanminah-deactivated20110731

Update on Jung! Such insight! Thank you! I unfortunately work out of a very old Linguistics book that gives very little information. Your input is very much appreciated! 

Awesome Foreign Word of the Day: Wanktok

Wanktok (Tok Pisin): a word in the Papua New Guinea Tok Pisin creole that refers to people who speak the same language as you do and have some form of claim on you. 
Pronounced:  Wahn-tok 

This word usually refers only to a people within families, villages, clans and slightly larger areas due to the generally small size of Papua New Guinea and its clans. Wanktok expresses the idea that people who share a common language are, in a way, indebted to each other, that they might as well be related by blood and are thusly expected to watch after and take care of their fellow Tok Pisin speakers. The linguistic isolation of Papua New Guineans is what allowed for such a word to come into being; imagine if every English speaker submitted some sort of claim on every other English speaker. Or if every Chinese speaker laid claim on other Chinese speakers. SO MUCH CLAIM.

But is that such a bad thing?

That would mean somebody would have given my sad, pathetic soul a ride last month when I was trudging down a hellishly hot backroad, locked out of my car, looking as tragic as possible, staring forlornly at the half consumed donut in my hand (most regrettable donut trip ever). Someone would have had to take responsibility for me. I would have delighted them with stories and cooked them a fabulous dinner, recognizing my own role to play in wanktok.

I submit that we should start practicing wanktok; the world would be a whole lot more friendly (and with less incidents of donut-runs-gone-bad) if we did.

The Linguistic Tree of Gondor.
matthen:

An interesting diagram showing the family tree of Indo-European languages. At the bottom is Proto-Indo-European, the reconstructed common ancestor. Its word *wel (‘turn’), for example, gave rise eventually to English words including: waltz, valve, convolve, evolve, revolt, valley, helix, wallow, willow, walk and Helen. [read this book!] [image source]

The Linguistic Tree of Gondor.

matthen:

An interesting diagram showing the family tree of Indo-European languages. At the bottom is Proto-Indo-European, the reconstructed common ancestor. Its word *wel (‘turn’), for example, gave rise eventually to English words including: waltz, valve, convolve, evolve, revolt, valley, helix, wallow, willow, walk and Helen. [read this book!] [image source]

Reblogged from matthen

Awesome Foreign Word of the Day: Jung

Jung (Korean): a feeling that is stronger than love and can only be proved when surviving a difficult argument.
Prononciation: Jung

This word should come with confetti and sparklers and a parade.

Let me explain.

I feel this word portrays something so epic in the love category that at the end of the argument, when you have achieved the highest love-honor of ‘jung’, a banner should fall down from the ceiling, one that reads ‘You Effing Did It’ and as it unravels there are balloons and a man in a top hat who will fly out of nowhere and deliver to you a bouquet of sparklers and designer cupcakes. This isn’t your pansy argument about who forgot to buy milk or who made who feel invalidated. This is your nuclear, fire raining from the sky brand of argument. The one where you throw your hands up and say, ‘this just isn’t working out’ and just when it seems it might end right there and then, you come back from the brink of relationship extinction, teetering away from that horrifying cliff and into the safe arms of your ‘constant.’

THAT is jung.

So, doesn’t it only seem fair that some sort of mini circus would explode from your floors and closets as you veer away from the relationship self destruct button? 

Why We Need to Start Figuring Out the Difference Between ‘alot’ and a lot”
The always hilarious blog Hyperbole and a Half offers a very important lesson on why the heck we should just get our shit together and learn the difference between ‘alot’ and ‘a lot.’ 
Here’s just a snippet of what you have to look forward to:”When someone types out “u” instead of “you,” instead of getting mad, I imagine them having only one finger on each hand and then their actions seem reasonable.”
Interest Piqued? Click here to learn more about the grammar correcting ‘Alot’. 

Why We Need to Start Figuring Out the Difference Between ‘alot’ and a lot”

The always hilarious blog Hyperbole and a Half offers a very important lesson on why the heck we should just get our shit together and learn the difference between ‘alot’ and ‘a lot.’ 

Here’s just a snippet of what you have to look forward to:”When someone types out “u” instead of “you,” instead of getting mad, I imagine them having only one finger on each hand and then their actions seem reasonable.”

Interest Piqued? Click here to learn more about the grammar correcting ‘Alot’.